writer: Brian Michael Bendis / artist: Mahmud Asrar

So, the All New X-Men’s current situation, being stranded in the Ultimate Universe has been a great example of what makes Brian Bendis’ book uniquely fun. Letting the Original Five get up to old school kid shenanigans is the kind of whimsical good time action the deathly franchise has needed. But can Bendis keep the good times rolling?

This issue seems to be more of the Original Five getting their bearings and making friends (and possibly enemies) in their new surroundings. Meanwhile, Jean Grey and Miles Morales seem to be the only proactive players in this scenario trying to get the young mutants back to their home dimension. I was expecting the Jean/Miles/Ganke interaction to be a lot more hilarious than it was but was saddened by how flat it felt. The time we spend with Young Iceman is well spent. I see that when Bendis can’t have a Peter Parker in his book to spout his brand of nonsense, Bobby Drake makes for a damn decent surrogate.

The story that really deserves more attention is Hank McCoy as a “guest” of Ulitimate Doom. Though Bendis’ dialogue is as witty and spot on as ever, the advancement of the actual plotline has slowed to a crawl. We’re not anywhere closer to finding out how the X-Men find themselves where they are, how they intend to get back home and what they intend to do about this new powerful mutant. Mamoud Asrar’s artwork has definitely stepped up by leaps and bounds from the last issue, but it’s too comparable to the work of Sara Pichelli and Stuart Immonen to not point out the fact that he’s NOT Sara Pichelli or Stuart Immonen. Still, we might just be far enough from the changing of the guard that most readers won’t notice.

Bottom Line: A much better looking installment. I just wish things would move along a little quicker. 7.5 out of 10

Tags:

  • Show Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comment *

  • name *

  • email *

  • website *