BNP Testimonies “On Surviving the Apocalypse”

In response to the staggering election results in which many members of marginalized communities experienced how disconnected they were from their fellow citizens as the country elected bigotry and hatred; Black Nerd Problems put out the call to hear how people were coping. Here is a collection of short essays on what we’re doing, just to get by.

The Threat:


Blossom Bri    Twitter: @atarigems/ Instagram: blackmindsmatterproject

A prayer and a promise in the form of a young black woman, her ancestor’s wildest dream.

On surviving the apocalypse, I remember that most importantly I am loved. The one thing this election has shown me is that the best tactic they have is isolation. Now more than ever I find myself in situations where I am extremely vulnerable, my life being on the line every day. Being vulnerable is powerful; admitting when I’m not okay is a strength. Being recognized as an organizer, writer and future educator, I’ve begun to realize that many people need me. They need me more than ever and they are gonna seek guidance.

I know a lot of people are gungho about trying to fight the war. Very gungho. People are ready to organize like the Fire Nation is about to attack or looking for the Seven Dragon Balls. We all wish we had that kind of power seen in our favorite movies, shows, and anime, but collective liberation doesn’t work like that. I too was once a wide-eyed millennial ready to look and danger in its face. Even though I screamed so much all the women of me grew tired, I was bounded by hopeless-ness. Did I shout my own version of “moon crystal power?” Had I shouted it long enough? I knew that I wanted to make a difference and promote change. I had too many day dreams of myself being a Sailor Scout. I know that 5 year old me dreamed of being one, to become a badass femme who fought by moonlight.
Not every day is jam packed with black girl magic. A little fearful, some days I couldn’t even make it out of the bed or let alone look at myself in the mirror. I know that I’m more real than magic though.

I made that daydream a reality in November 2014 after an open mic the night of Darren Wilson’s nonindictment , helping to lead a protest on campus. That was one of the most exhilarating nights of my life, since then I led safe space discussions, done presentations and more. Most days I have to remember that I am loved. On days I feel hopeless like Wednesday, and the world slows down immensely. Not every day is jam packed with black girl magic. A little fearful, some days I couldn’t even make it out of the bed or let alone look at myself in the mirror. I know that I’m more real than magic though. This weekend I watched Moonlight, cried with friends, and went to a light festival. We danced, roasted white people, and truly engaged in what I call Joy of color. Like an episode outta Avatar, we’ve been linking up and making plans for what seems like our impending doom.Our black, brown, muslim, queer, and anything in between has value and that we will fight for whoever they are.

Our fun doesn’t change the circumstances of America today, but it solidifies that we have each other. Our black, brown, muslim, queer, and anything in between has value and that we will fight for whoever they are.

“It is our duty to fight for our freedom”

Sometimes the most important thing in times like this is letting people know they are loved.

Photo Credit: Paloma Anaya

Photo Credit: Paloma Anaya

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