Writer: Rodney Barnes / Artist: Joshua Cassara / Marvel Comics

In its first two issues, Falcon has been a bit disappointing because it hasn’t measured up to the stature of the character’s previous series as Captain America. To be fair, that’s a very high bar to pass and it may have been unfair to use as a point of comparison. Where those series, most notably Captain America: Sam Wilson, took risks that either made readers love or loathe it, Falcon appears to play it safe.

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Instead of taking on deeply political issues, Falcon uses them as an entry way to get Sam back into the old guard of fighting demons and being the old soul who rarely uses profanity and probably thinks modern rap music is creating a generation of heathens.

Regardless, Falcon #3 is an improvement in the series. Using a flashback to Sam’s past almost always helps make him more relatable—which he could definitely use right now—and the bickering between he and his new sidekick, Patriot, sounds much more natural and reminiscent of actual conversations people have. Also, as someone who’s not incredibly familiar with Doctor Voodoo, it’s been really cool seeing so much of him and his abilities on display. It’s always fun to see sparsely used characters get called up.

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How exactly is Sam so adamant about not harming police officers while they’re shooting him with every intent to kill him, but has no problem letting loose on a militia of gangbangers looking to do the same? I’m just sensing a bit of a double standard here. Maybe I’m wrong.

7.5 out of 10

Reading Falcon? Find BNP’s other reviews of the series here.

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