Raven: Daughter of Darkness #4 Review

Writer: Marv Wolfman / Artist: Pop Mhan / DC Comics

“Trigon? Why does everything involve my father?” After Raven learns of her father’s horrific quest to reproduce and the surprise appearance of her mother, Raven is left in one hell of a triangle. There is the Baron who, along with the leopard Merlin, are watching her every move with mysterious motive. There’s also the faceless girls, now known as Raven’s sisters, who are desperate to kill her for reasons we don’t quite yet understand. At the heart of the issue though is Raven and her mother Angela. The two clearly love each other dearly, but Raven wants to know the truth of her mother’s life before her — the life that led to her relationship with Satan himself and the faceless sisters trying to kill her — while Angela wants to protect her daughter from the pain of that knowledge.

Their relationship is rather beautiful in their dynamic. Raven is so powerful and physically protects her mother, while Angela’s authority comes simply from being her mother. Now that Raven is older though, she is pushing back against that authority and being more demanding in that adolescent way that says yes, you’re my mother, but no, I’m not too young to understand. Not anymore.

The story is thrust forward by the constant threat of death from the sisters hunting them. Meanwhile, the mystery of the Baron has us searching for clues as to how he ties into it, all while Raven and Angela are coming to grips with the past and what it might mean for their lives today. It’s a fun story, deeply emotional, full of action, and beautifully drawn.

Overall, we’re a third of the way through the 12-part miniseries and we’re right on track for a book to be even better than the last. Look forward to continuing this adventure.

8.2 out of 10

Reading Raven? Find BNP’s other reviews of the series here.

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  • Jordan Calhoun is a writer in New York City. His forthcoming debut book "Piccolo Is Black" is a celebration of the common adaptations we made while non-diverse pop culture helped us form identities. He holds a B.A. in Sociology and Criminal Justice, B.S. in Psychology with a minor in Japanese, and an M.P.A. in Public and Nonprofit Management and Policy. He might solve a mystery, or rewrite history. Find him on Instagram and Twitter @JordanMCalhoun

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