The Power of Invisibility in ‘Invisible Woman #1’ Review

Invisible Woman #1 Cover
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Writer: Mark Waid / Artist: Mattia De Iulis / MARVEL

Friendly Force-Field

Of course the Invisible Woman is a secret agent, what did you expect? The comic opens out like a lit video game. We’re thrown in the midst of a mission. Readers are then exposed to a partnership that reveals to be more powerful than let out in the first couple of panels. This snowy fight reveals the power of secrecy. Visibility has the power to either make our moves direct and intentional or mindless and static. Recognizing this, Sue has reigned victorious in her missions and has now allowed that knowledge to reflect in her daily life. What I love about Invisible Woman #1 is that we get to analyze the superpower of invisibility versus the darkness it also wields.

Invisibility as a Super Power

Sue outside of the suit is a pretty standard (super). Recognizing that you have love for your family and friends but also seeing that time pushes you into the background. Date nights, friendly fire, even the involvement with your children. Once things begin to normalize, that’s when fear hits. It doesn’t necessarily feel peaceful, nor does it feel chaotic, rather it’s isolating. Sue becomes more aware of her place within people’s lives, and that’s when the invisibility hits.

The most interesting part about Sue’s recognition of this fact is that it seems as if she feels stoic. Almost accepting. The whole time I just felt for her, but not once did I deny the power I know she has.

The Waid-De Iulis team managed to pull on the hearts of readers by showing Sue as both the powerhouse and the wallflower. What I hope to see in future issues is an analysis of her powers and how that reflects in Sue’s movements. It would be an interesting way to not only talk about the growth of Sue as a hero, but Sue’s relationship with those around her. When is Sue a force field? When is Sue invisible? What does her world look like when she’s both? I’m excited to see what this world looks like.

8.8 INVISIBLE WEAPONRY out of 10

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  • Khadjiah Johnson is a Caribbean-American writer and humor advocate who uses poetry and comedy as a leverage to empathize and uplift. Her work has taken her to Madison Square Garden, Lincoln Center, Apollo Theater, BET, Off-Broadway and many more! She hopes to use her talents to sway her way into the writers room for a Late Night Comedy Show.

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